R2-D2 Limited Edition Home Theater Projector by Nikko

Nikko R2-D2 home theater

I just ran across possibly the most awesome Star Wars item ever. Nikko America has a special edition remote control R2-D2 home theater audio/video projector that does just about everything. It has a ton of features, including being able to project on the ceiling (not sure I’d ever use that), official sounds, and a ton of inputs including an iPod dock. The tech specs are pretty good, but I’m sure you can build your own home theater that is better with less than the $2900 price tag. It won’t have the massive geek factor that R2-D2 has though. Be sure to check out the video to see it in action.

2 thoughts on “R2-D2 Limited Edition Home Theater Projector by Nikko”

  1. Odd, looks like the website is down. It was a pretty good concept, but I think it was more of a gimmick than anything else. I vaguely remember that it was very expensive.

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