I am a Zombie Filled with Love by Isaac Marion

I’m sure that everyone has seen a zombie movie at some point or another, whether having classic zombies such as Night of the Living Dead, or fast moving zombies in 28 Days Later or I am Legend. The classic portrayal of a zombie is that of a slow moving mindless killer. But what if there was something more?

What kind of life, or death for that matter, do zombies experience? Are they aware of their nature, or do they mindlessly seek out human flesh to feed on? Do they know they are zombies, and if so, do they know how they came to be? Is there anything left of the person they once were, or are they transformed into a new flesh eating monster? What are a zombies thoughts on death? Do they experience emotions?

Isaac Marion eloquently explores these questions and more in his short story, I am a Zombie Filled With Love. The story is very well written in a sort of dry matter-of-fact humor. While there is plenty of humor involved, there are many philosophical insights discussed as well. Are living humans really better off than zombies? Follow the link and read the story, then you decide.

1 thought on “I am a Zombie Filled with Love by Isaac Marion”

  1. I loved reading this story, thank you for sharing. I think the whole concept zombies in stories and film is a commentary about ourselves as a species. Just look at Shaun of the Dead. The people became zombies overnight just because of the monotony of their daily routines.

    I guess Isaac is saying we’re better off dead maybe.

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